Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Medical and Clinical Microbiology Westin Miyako Kyoto, Japan .

Day 2 :

Conference Series Clinical Microbiology 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Divocha Valentina  photo
Biography:

Divocha Valentina in 1967 she graduated from I. I. Mechnikov Odessa State University, Faculty of Biology (Department of Virology). In 1973 continued her postgraduate study ate Odessa Institute of Virology and Epidemiology (specialty virology). In 1974 she was awarded her candidate degree with the thesis "Interaction of Coxsackie B viruses with sensitive cell cultures and their antigenic relationships." In 2009 she was awarded her doctoral degree with the thesis entitled "Biological basis antiprotease therapy of influenza."Under her leadership performed a doctoral and two master's theses. Scientific experience is 35 years. I have more than 241 scientific publications, 3 monographs, textbook "Virology" (2012), 12 patents, 4 innovations.
I am currently working as the departament biochemistry Lugansk State Medical University, is the supervisor of the nine research programs in virology and biochemistry.

 

Abstract:

Proteolytic activation is widespread among viruses of different taxonomic groups. Thus, the proteolytic activation of influenza viruses and paramyxoviruses is carried by trypsin-like proteinases of a host cell which hydrolyze the peptide bond between arginine and lysine. Objective: to extract trypsin-like proteinase from the lungs of healthy mice and get  hyperimmune serum to it for the treatment of experimental influenza. We used the lungs of 100 white mice to isolate trypsin–like proteinase; influenza virus A/PR/8/34; white rats were used to produce hyperimmune  antiproteinase sera to study their protective function in the body of white mice infected with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. From the lungs of healthy mice 6 isoforms of trypsin – like proteinases were isolated, and hyperimmune antiproteinase rats’ sera were obtained to them. At the treatment by these sera the white mice, previously infected with a lethal dose of influenza A virus, 60% of the animals under experiment survived only by the use of the serum to the third isoform of trypsin-like proteinase. In the control group, where no treatment was performed, the infected with a lethal dose of influenza virus animals had a 100% lethality on the 4-5th day after infection. The results obtained show that it is possible to get antiproteinase vaccine for the flu, which will block the flu virus in the intercellular space and disrupt the development of the pathological process.

 

  • Agricultural Microbiology

Session Introduction

Nidhi Srivastava

H.N.B. Garhwal University, Srinagar, Uttarakhand

Title: Diversity and function of rhizobacteria isolated from Zanthoxylum armatum Dc.
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nidhi Srivastava PhD microbiology from H.N.B. Garhwal University Srinagar Uttarakhand (A central University) in August 2015 entitled Functional diversity of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria associated with rhizospheric soil of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. Under the supervision of Prof. A. B. Bhatt retired from vice chancellor of H.N.B. Garhwal University. At present I am working in Modern Institute of Technology as assistant professor since May 2015. I have good knowledge of microbiology subject. I have done three Master of Science dissertation under my.  As a teacher I want to spread my knowledge to students for their better future

Abstract:

Zanthoxylum armatum DC is an endangered medicinal plant, used in toothache, stomachache, diarrhea etc. Rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbes and should be explored for obtaining plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), which enhance the growth of the plant either directly or indirectly. A total of 144 rhizobacteria were isolated from rhizospheric soil of Z. armatum DC. A total of 12 different genera were identified. A total of 29.17% were Bacillus followed by Pseudomonas (21.53%), Klebsiella, Micrococcus (6.25%) each, Staphylococcus, Azotobacter, Flavobacterium and Serratia being 4.86% each, Xanthomonas (3.47%), Alcaligenes and Enterobacter (2.78%) each and Azospirillium (0.69%). Bacillus was dominant in rhizosphere of Z. armatum followed by Pseudomonas sp. All isolates were tested for PGPR properties. A Total of 67.36% isolates were found to be positive for IAA production. These isolates produced IAA ranged between 0.693±0.83µg/ml to 73.41±1.95µg/ml. Highest IAA was produced by Pseudomonas sp. (S3KS8) from Site-3 while lowest IAA was produced by Micrococcus sp. (S3UW3) from Site-3. A total of 46.53% isolates were found to be positive for phosphate solubilization. These isolates solubilized phosphate ranging from 21.4±1.02% to 309.1±1.63%. Highest phosphate was solubilized by Bacillus sp. (S2DS7) from Site-2 and lowest by Serratia sp. (S3UR1) from Site-3. Another important trait of PGPR, that may indirectly influence the plant growth, is the production of ammonia. A total of 63.19% isolates were found to be positive for ammonia production. Among them 32.61% rhizobacteria produced high amount of ammonia followed by 42.39% moderate and 25.0% generated low amount of ammonia.

 

  • Microbiology

Session Introduction

Radu Ionescu

Uppsala University , Sweden

Title: Diagnosis of Human Echinococcosis via Exhaled Breath Analysis
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Radu Ionescu received his Ph.D degree in Electronics Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain, in 2003. He was successively postdoctoral researcher, senior researcher and research director at Rovira i Virgili Univeristy (Spain), experienced researcher at Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy), EC Senior Researcher at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology (Israel), project director at Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry Petru Poni (Romania), project director at SITEX 45 SRL (Romania), and currently he is visiting researcher and project coordinator at Uppsala University (Sweden). Dr. Radu Ionescu's research focuses on diseases diagnosis through volatile samples analysis.

Abstract:

Human echinococcosis is among the most neglected infectious diseases affecting more than one million people globally. The diagnosis and treatment of human echinococcosis is often expensive and the disease remains complicated to treat. The detection and diagnosis of echinococcus infections at an early stage is highly needed for the prescription of suitable clinical treatment. In this study, we introduce a non-invasive, fast, easy-to-operate and non-expensive diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of human echinococcosis disease through exhaled breath analysis, suitable for early diagnosis and population screening. A case control study was realized on a group of volunteers diagnosed with the two main types of the disease, cystic echinococcosis and alveolar echinococcosis, recruited in hospitals from Tunisia and Poland, as well as their control groups. The chemical analysis of the breath samples by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy revealed statistically different compounds in the breath of the patients as compared to controls. Based on these results, an electronic nose system comprising an array of highly sensitive chemoresistive gas sensors was developed and trained for the diagnosis of human echinococcosis. The classification success rate achieved by our electronic nose system was 100% for cystic echinococcosis and 92.9% for alveolar echinococcosis, while the discrimination between these patient groups was 92.1%. The test proposed in this study is simple to perform and interpret, and can be used in both specialist and non-specialist settings. Therefore it could represent a very useful diagnostic tool to combat infectious diseases caused by helminths, in particular in low-resource regions.

 

 

Abdeen Mustafa Omer

Associate Researcher at Occupational Health Administration ,Sudan

Title: Counterfeit Drugs Set Alarm Bells Ringing: Comparative Analysis of Drug Policies
Speaker
Biography:

Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Occupational Health Administration, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Khartoum, Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books.

 

Abstract:

The strategy of price liberalisation and privatisation had been implemented in Sudan over the last decade, and has had a positive result on government deficit. The investment law approved recently has good statements and rules on the above strategy in particular to pharmacy regulations. Under the pressure of the new privatisation policy, the government introduced radical changes in the pharmacy regulations. To improve the effectiveness of the public pharmacy, resources should be switched towards areas of need, reducing inequalities and promoting better health conditions. Medicines are financed either through cost sharing or full private. The role of the private services is significant. A review of reform of financing medicines in Sudan is given in this article. Also, it highlights the current drug supply system in the public sector, which is currently responsibility of the Central Medical Supplies Public Corporation (CMS). In Sudan, the researchers did not identify any rigorous evaluations or quantitative studies about the impact of drug regulations on the quality of medicines and how to protect public health against counterfeit or low quality medicines, although it is practically possible. However, the regulations must be continually evaluated to ensure the public health is protected against by marketing high quality medicines rather than commercial interests, and the drug companies are held accountable for their conducts.

 

Speaker
Biography:

M. Zamri-Saad has completed his PhD in veterinary pathology from the University of Liverpool in 1986. Currently, he is the coordinator of Research Center for Ruminant Diseases, a centre that study important ruminant diseases. His main research interests are the ruminant and fish diseases. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and is currently serving as the Editor-in-Chief for Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Sciences.

 

 

Abstract:

Phagocytosis and Killing of Brucella melitensis by Phagocytic Cells and Lymphocytes of Goats: This paper describes the phagocytosis and killing efficiency of the phagocytic cells, and lymphocytes of goats. Six adult male goats were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was exposed subcutaneously to 109 cfu/mL of killed B. melitensis while Group 2 was similarly exposed to sterile PBS. After 2 weeks, blood samples were collected. The neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes were isolated and prepared as monolayer. Then, 200 µL of an inoculum containing 107 cfu/mL of live

B. melitensis was introduced and incubated at 370C in 5% CO2. At 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of incubation, they were harvested, stained with acridine orange and observed under fluorescence microscope at x1000 magnification. A minimum of 100 cells were examined for the presence and viability of bacteria.

Phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages showed increasing pattern with time. Earlier exposure significantly (p<0.05) enhanced the phagocytic activity after 60 min and 120 min by neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. Penetration into the lymphocytes also increased with time and earlier exposure significantly (p<0.05) enhanced the penetration after 60min. There was insignificant (p>0.05) killing efficiency by the neutrophils but the macrophages showed significant (p<0.05) increasing pattern after 60min. Similarly, survival of B. melitensis within the lymphocytes showed insignificant (p>0.05) decreasing pattern. In conclusion, exposure to killed B. melitensis significantly (p<0.05) enhanced the phagocytosis and killing efficiency of macrophages but insignificantly (p>0.05) improved the killing by neutrophils and lymphocytes.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Maheshi Mapalagamage has completed her B. Sc. (Special) Hons. (First class) Special Degree in Zoology, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka and currently she is reading for a PhD at Institute of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IBMBB), University of Colombo. Her PhD is based on investigating prognositic markers for severe dengue infection with respect to oxidative stress and endothelial dysfucntion and underling immunopathogenic mechanisms. She is also working as an Assistant lectuerer at Department of Zoology and Environment Sciences, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. In addition, she is being working as a collabarative trainer for RT-PCR workshops conducted by Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany

Abstract:

High vascular permeability is a main feature of severe dengue infection resulting in plasma leakage leading to many adverse effects on patients increasing disease morbidity and mortality. The role of serum Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) which are known to be associated with endothelial stability in patients with different disease stages were studied. Serum samples were taken from confirmed dengue fever (DF) patients on admission (DFA, n=36) and discharge (DFD, n=18); from confirmed dengue hemorrhagic fever patients (DHF) three sets of samples were used; on admission (DHFA, n=36), at critical stage (DHFC, n=26) and on discharge (DHFD, n=18). Age-gender matched healthy individuals were also recruited as controls (HC, n=24). Results showed that Ang-1 and Ang-2 levels are associated with disease status in DHF but not in DF. The highest Ang-2 levels were observed in DHFC samples as compared to DHFA, DFA, DFD and HC (p<0.002 in all comparisons); the lowest Ang-1 levels were observed in DHFC samples compared to DHFA, DHFD and HC (p<0.050 for all). Specifically, the ratio of serum Ang-2/Ang-1 levels in DHFC were the highest compared to all other study categories tested (p<0.001 for all-Figure 1). A significant positive correlation was observed between serum Ang-1 and platelet count in DHFA samples (Pearson r=0.674, p<0.001) and Ang-1 with Pulse pressure in DHFC category (r=0.636, p=0.011). Using a cut-off value of 1.02 for the Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio of samples obtained at the critical stage a sensitivity of 82.6% and specificity of 80.4% discerning DF from DHF was obtained. This signifies the potential use of the serum Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio as a biomarker for DHF critical stage.

 

  • Medical Microbiology
Speaker
Biography:

Abdul Ghani Ghumro has completed his M.S at the age of 29 years from Institute of Microbiology, Shah Abdul Latif University Khairpur Mir’s Sindh, Pakistan.

Abstract:

Microbial enzymes are for the most part utilized in modern procedures because of their minimal effort, large productivity, substance stability, environment protection, flexibility and huge availability. Some thermophilic Bacillus species utilized as bacterial workhorses in modern microbial developments for the creation of an assortment of enzymes and additionally fine biochemical for a considerable length of time. The α-Amylase are a standout amongst the most critical business compound about 25% to 33% of the world's enzyme market. Thus this study to isolate thermophiles bacteria from soil samples, samples were collected from Nara desert area (Khairpur Mir’s). Isolated bacterial culture (thermophilic Bacillus species) to inoculate on primary screening media for the detection of α-Amylase enzyme activity, Selected isolate was sent to Macrogen Inc., Seol, Korea, (as pure culture stocks) for commercial identification of the isolate through PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. The effect of culture conditions on the production of α-Amylase enzyme, optimization parameters were optimized like temperature (45, 50, 55, 60 and 65°C), pH (6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, 8.5 and 9.0 pH), agitation speed (100, 160, 200 and 250 rpm), age of inoculum (12, 24 and 36 hrs), size of inoculum (5, 10, 15 and 20%), under controlled condition. Therefore, it was observed that STB A1 isolate related with the reference strain (Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BGSC 9A20)), that produce a thermostable α-Amylase enzyme. Results were recorded by using the DNS assay and the protein estimation for detection of α-Amylase production and activity. So, the optimum temperature noted is 60°C (1639.78 U/ml), pH 7.5 (1734.44 U/ml), agitation speed 160 rpm (1745.18 U/ml), 24 hours age of inoculum (1750.11 U/ml) and 5% size of inoculum (1850.13 U/mi). Optimum enzyme activity in DNS assay condition, temperature stability at 60°C (1938.65 U/ml/min), reaction time is 35 min (2025.41 U/ml/min), dextrose substrate (2201.04 U/ml/min) and substrate concentration 1% (2326.11 U/ml/min), optimum conditions for the α-Amylase enzyme production and activity.